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Tootie… that’s great!!!

Funny thing – Laura, who wrote the article you cite, is part of my “Gang of Five” who get together for Ladies Night cocktails once a month. She’s also the VP of CARDA and I train with her every week. She lives just miles from my house. Ive seen this paper before and the repost reminds me that I need to ask her a few things about her methodology (causation vs association). However, it’s one of the only review-style papers I have seen on this topic. BTW, she’s an engineer for Shell Oil by profession. This paper was written by her because she’s passionate about all things dogs. She’s not an academic and not a medical or bioscience person. Just an observation – not a judgement by any means.

Tootie

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Tootie Tatum, Ph.D., HCLD(ABB)Project Manager Group Leader
JGI-Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
(806) 535-9470

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On Oct 8, 2012, at 9:59 AM, Kathleen Corum <kathleen.corum> wrote:

Research and a treatise on spay/neuter which is unbiased, isn’t in support of a hidden agenda or personal profit motive:

http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongTermHealthEffectsOfSpayNeuterInDogs.pdf

About dog breeding, url below. I’d add the comment that if the breed you love takes a direction you do not like, and you have what you believe is the ideal bitch but choose to spay her, then you need to accept responsibility for the direction your breed is taking … You chose to remove your bitch and her genes from the gene pool. I will say also, that we all have different ideas about what the “ideal bitch” is. In the current political climate, breeding in general is being condemned…. despite the fact that dog ownership is universally loved and people want to give puppies loving homes. It is easy to find fault with other breeders, partially for that reason, but I think not only for that reason, unfortunately. Breeders are not generally supportive of one another. This is a blog post regarding “how many bitches does a breeder need”.

https://cynoanarchist.wordpress.com/2012/10/06/bitch-bitch-bitch-now-with-extra-snark/

About the APHIS Licensing changes. This has a nation wide impact. But what I suggest keeping in mind is that there is a glut of legislation all over the US targeting small breeders…. punitive measures actually … not all nationwide but at all levels of government. IMO raising puppies in the home is a “most important” factor in great puppy development. The AHIS licensing change will discourage that. There is a problem with any ordinances or other regulation which are obstructive to occasional litters raised thoughtfully, lovingly, and responsibly in the home. (With “Responsibly” being a problematic term, I’d say.)

http://cynoanarchist.wordpress.com/2012/05/22/why-the-proposed-aphis-licensing-changes-will-screw-small-hobby-breeders-and-the-people-who-buy-puppies-from-them/

Kathleen

Research and a treatise on spay/neuter which is unbiased, isn’t in support of a hidden agenda or personal profit motive:

http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongTermHealthEffectsOfSpayNeuterInDogs.pdf

About dog breeding, url below. I’d add the comment that if the breed you love takes a direction you do not like, and you have what you believe is the ideal bitch but choose to spay her, then you need to accept responsibility for the direction your breed is taking … You chose to remove your bitch and her genes from the gene pool. I will say also, that we all have different ideas about what the "ideal bitch" is. In the current political climate, breeding in general is being condemned…. despite the fact that dog ownership is universally loved and people want to give puppies loving homes. It is easy to find fault with other breeders, partially for that reason, but I think not only for that reason, unfortunately. Breeders are not generally supportive of one another. This is a blog post regarding "how many bitches does a breeder need".

https://cynoanarchist.wordpress.com/2012/10/06/bitch-bitch-bitch-now-with-extra-snark/

About the APHIS Licensing changes. This has a nation wide impact. But what I suggest keeping in mind is that there is a glut of legislation all over the US targeting small breeders…. punitive measures actually … not all nationwide but at all levels of government. IMO raising puppies in the home is a "most important" factor in great puppy development. The AHIS licensing change will discourage that. There is a problem with any ordinances or other regulation which are obstructive to occasional litters raised thoughtfully, lovingly, and responsibly in the home. (With "Responsibly" being a problematic term, I’d say.)

http://cynoanarchist.wordpress.com/2012/05/22/why-the-proposed-aphis-licensing-changes-will-screw-small-hobby-breeders-and-the-people-who-buy-puppies-from-them/

Kathleen

This weekend

Hello puppy family!

Well the ‘old folks’ just had quite the weekend.

I was asked to judge a few ‘overflow’ test runs at an AHBA Herding Trial and decided to do it for some ‘free entries’. On Saturday Chance took High Scoring Sheep and High Combined along with second and third placements and four championship points. For the weekend he racked up 8 championship points altogether … 8 out of the ten required for the Championship title. He already has a HTCh but he came mighty close to a HTCh2…. if there were such a thing as in agility, obedience, etc. We had some very nice runs. I felt that perhaps his best run of the weekend was his last one… He’d been getting more and more cranked up as the weekend progressed. At someone’s suggestion, I took him out on the road and threw his toy (at the risk of burning or ripping his pads) just like I used to do when he was a puppy. That was exactly what was needed to take the edge off so he could relax for his last run and he worked like a ‘grown up dog’!!! I hadn’t trialed him in almost a year. And it was quite a pleasure to do the teamwork with him, plus visit with my herding friends.

I think I shared the video of Chance herding out on the desert here recently. But in case anyone has missed seeing it, here it is again:

http://youtu.be/p15VhrRkS8A

Tempie took Reserve Winners Bitch on Sunday at the Prescott Arizona Kennel Club show. A friend, Karen Mantie, showed her for me. Karen said she was a good little girl. Still some ground to cover to finish a Championship with her. But she shows well.

Kathleen

Chance and I practiced herding out on the desert today. Thought you might enjoy seeing "Dad". May need some Dramamine to make it through the video though 🙂 !!!

Here’s the link:

Kathleen

Puppy family,

I’ve found another web site by a breeder which makes an interesting presentation of disclosure information:

http://www.kuymal.com/Litters%20doc%20epi.pdf

The more I learn, the more I realize that genetic faults are not so uncommon as are these testimonials from breeders. In an effort to be exact with the information, the writer has not dumbed down the information or made it a particularly easy read, but instead it is all there.

At this point, it is probable that one of the Chance X Tempie male puppies will be a cryptorchid. Like many other genetic problems, the explanation of inheritance of cryptorchidism, or even whether it is heritable, is unknown. Cryptorchids are themselves most likely sterile and the problem therefore self limiting (if heritable) through the male line.

The epilepsy problem described in the above url is surely a much more significant issue for pet homes than the cryptorchidism which after neutering is ‘resolved’, although the surgery is more like the spaying of a female than the typical neutering operation. Please do let me know if any of your puppies do develop problems which might be heritable.

I hope you are all fully enjoying being puppy parents!
Kathleen

Health Disclosures

A while back I came across this web page wherein a breeder does an exemplary job of health disclosures on the puppies she’s raised. This is very commendable. I am certain though, that many if not most pet puppy buyers will be very reluctant to do a lot of the health testing that has to be done to have so much information to share. None the less, as much information as possible needs to be shared for the betterment of our beloved breeds. As breeders we try to produce healthy puppies, but as she points out, recessive and multi gene problems can surface many generations apart. In some cases, attempts to minimize the probabilities of recurrence are appropriate. Eliminating individuals from the gene pool isn’t always the best course of action. I hope you find this disclosure as enlightening as I did. This is coming from what is obviously a very responsible breeder.

http://www.isengardbelgians.com/Health%20Info.htm